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North Castle Daily News

Young Voters Register For First Time
By Jackson Harrower and Emily Sherman

May 16, 2016
As the 2016 presidential election inches closer, discussions of the election are more frequent. An important battleground for candidates is the vote of the millennial generation (those born between 1982 and 2004). With a population of 83 million, the millennials are now the largest generation in the country and make up 26% percent of the nation’s population. The baby boomers, formerly the largest generation, now make up 24% of the population with 75 million people.


Young Voters Register For First Time
By Jackson Harrower and Emily Sherman

May 16, 2016
As the 2016 presidential election inches closer, discussions of the election are more frequent. An important battleground for candidates is the vote of the millennial generation (those born between 1982 and 2004). With a population of 83 million, the millennials are now the largest generation in the country and make up 26% percent of the nation’s population. The baby boomers, formerly the largest generation, now make up 24% of the population with 75 million people.

It’s crucial to the future of voter turnout in America that millennials are part of the democratic system. Their future is on the line and therefore their voice should be heard. Candidates are actively pursuing the votes of millennials by advertising through social media, including Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat, and by discussing issues seen as most relevant to millennials, especially the environment, civil rights, and economic inequality.

For Byram Hills students, the process of registering to vote is made easy as the history teacher provides students with the voter registration form. The form is given to anyone who will be 18 by the date of either the primary election or Election Day 2016. After everyone has filled out their registration, the history teacher collects them and sends them to the Westchester County Board of Elections. The entire process takes less than five minutes, giving us no excuse not to be registered. Not only is it easy to register, but when everyone registers together there is a sense of unity and belonging. A large group of new voters feel like they are doing the right thing, encouraging everyone to register together.

Dr. Sandra Abt has been teaching History and Economics at Byram Hills since 1971. She has helped thousands of students register to vote. She says that millennials are interested in positive change. She describes millennials as having “an optimistic disaffection” and are less excited by the concept of policies staying the way they have been. Parents and schools have the greatest responsibility to get young voters involved.

“This year, with the exception of about five students, we were able to register everyone in the senior class. Students were more engaged this year than I’ve ever seen,” says Dr. Abt. Another trend she noted is the increase in the number of students registering independent as the majority of registered students did not select a political party. When she started teaching at Byram Hills in 1971, the student body was overwhelmingly Republican. The high school holds mock presidential elections every four years, and the Republican candidate won every mock election until 1992 when Bill Clinton won. Since then, the school has “elected” the Democratic candidate every election.

Democracy functions at its best when everyone participates in the process regardless of age, ethnicity, sex, or economic status. Actively incorporating young voters into the democratic system helps ensure the health of the process for decades to come.


Byram Hills High School Cum Laude
Byram Hills Seniors Inducted into Cum Laude for Academic Success

October 29, 2015
Twenty-three seniors were inducted this week into the Byram Hills High School chapter of the Cum Laude Society for their academic achievements.

Principal Chris Borsari congratulated the inductees both for being at the top of a particularly high-achieving class and for pursuing excellence in their other activities, which include theater, sports, science research and music.

“Their impact on our school community has been profound,’’ Mr. Borsari said. The inductees are: Erica Bank, Sela Berenblum, Rebecca Cawkwell, Kevin Chang, Andrea Cornelius, Sarah Crucilla, Jolie Feldman, Jackson Harrower, Ryan Infante, Marisa Kaplan, Nicole Kim, Miriam Lachs, Stuart Robbins, Dominick Rowan, Chad Schwam, Carly Schwartz, Kohro Shimizu, Lyndsay Siegle, Rebecca Simon, Danielle Skelly, Sarah Tang, Bailey Winston, and Alexander Wurm.  English teacher David Hubbs was the faculty inductee.

The seniors were also congratulated by Dr. Sandra Abt, who welcomed them into the prestigious society dedicated to honoring scholastic achievement in secondary schools, and by music teacher Marna Weiss. Ms. Weiss, the faculty inductee at last year’s ceremony, told the students that it was important to fully participate in all stages of their journey through school and life, and not to be in a rush to reach the next destination.

“Stay in the moment and enjoy the ride,” she advised. Ms. Weiss said to bring the following qualities along on their journey: resilience, perseverance, integrity, a willingness to learn from failure, patience, passion, and faith in themselves. She also told the students to find a song that speaks to them that they can sing when they need a boost.

If the students needed any help finding a song, they only had to keep listening. Backed up by student musicians, Ms. Weiss then sang “The Climb,” which was made popular by Miley Cyrus. The high school Jazz Choir also performed at the induction ceremony.